Teaser Tuesday

Basically, you post a 2-sentence excerpt from a book on your own blog, just as I did on mine. Then you go to http://shouldbereading.wordpress.com and comment on the Teaser Tuesday post there, and include the link to your blog post in your comment. Other people who comment will go to your blog and leave comments there, and you’ll visit their blogs too. There are over 100 comments on the Should Be Reading post today.
Basically, this introduces readers to various books and drives readers to your blog, increasing your SEO (search engine optimization).

MY POST:

That night when the guards were smoking their opium and laughing, I tried to ask Faresh what she missed most about home.

Her reply was, “You must never think about home, you must think about this, this is your life now.”

From: “Lori’s Song” by Lori Foroozandeh

Amazon link: Available on KINDLE, Paperback and Hardcover.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/1432738291/?tag=losso-20&camp=14573&creative=327641&linkCode=as1&creativeASIN=1432738291&adid=0KESH5SQTHNBG1SRQGY4&&ref-refURL=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.loris-song.com%2F

More information on PTSD.

What is PTSD??

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an emotional illness that develops as a result of a terribly frightening, life-threatening, or otherwise highly unsafe experience. PTSD sufferers re-experience the traumatic event or events in some way, tend to avoid places, people, or other things that remind them of the event (avoidance), and are exquisitely sensitive to normal life experiences (hyperarousal). Although this condition has likely existed since human beings have endured trauma, PTSD has only been recognized as a formal diagnosis since 1980. However, it was called by different names as early as the American Civil War, when combat veterans were referred to as suffering from “soldier’s heart.” In World War I, symptoms that were generally consistent with PTSD were referred to as “combat fatigue.” Soldiers who developed such symptoms in World War II were said to be suffering from “gross stress reaction,” and many who fought in Vietnam who had symptoms of what is now called PTSD were assessed as having “post-Vietnam syndrome.” PTSD has also been called “battle fatigue” and “shell shock.” Complex posttraumatic stress disorder (C-PTSD) usually results from prolonged exposure to a traumatic event or series thereof and is characterized by long-lasting problems with many aspects of emotional and social functioning.

Approximately 7%-8% of people in the United States will likely develop PTSD in their lifetime, with the lifetime occurrence (prevalence) in combat veterans and rape victims ranging from 10% to as high as 30%. Somewhat higher rates of this disorder have been found to occur in African Americans, Hispanics, and Native Americans compared to Caucasians in the United States. Some of that difference is thought to be due to higher rates of dissociation soon before and after the traumatic event (peritraumatic); a tendency for individuals from minority ethnic groups to blame themselves, have less social support, and an increased perception of racism for those ethnic groups; as well as differences between how ethnic groups may express distress. Other important facts about PTSD include the estimate of 5 million people who suffer from PTSD at any one time in the United States and the fact that women are twice as likely to develop PTSD as men

Almost half of individuals who use outpatient mental-health services have been found to suffer from PTSD. As evidenced by the occurrence of stress in many individuals in the United States in the days following the 2001 terrorist attacks, not being physically present at a traumatic event does not guarantee that one cannot suffer from traumatic stress that can lead to the development of PTSD

PTSD statistics in children and teens reveal that up to more than 40% have endured at least one traumatic event, resulting in the development of PTSD in up to 15% of girls and 6% of boys. On average, 3%-6% of high school students in the United States and as many as 30%-60% of children who have survived specific disasters have PTSD. Up to 100% of children who have seen a parent killed or endured sexual assault or abuse tend to develop PTSD, and more than one-third of youths who are exposed to community violence will suffer from the disorder.

AUTHORS NOTE:

I suffer from PTSD, I was in a POW type camp in Iran for 6 weeks. I went to Iran in 1998 with my Iranian husband and once there he refused to let me come home to the USA. The day after 9-11, anyone with TIES to Americans; that is friends or family were put into these camps, and were beat and raped. After I escaped I was flown to the American embassy in Dubai, UAE, since there is no American embassy in Iran. I walked off the plane into Detroit metro airport weighing 70 pounds and missing most of my teeth and had many closed head injuries. I have published a book and have a website dedicated to cause of womens rights in these countries…the reasoning behind this is included in my online version of my book at:

http://www.loris-song.com/

I hope you this information helps!

Remembering 911

My students- Layla is on the Right End.

 

My heart goes out to those who lost loved ones, knew those who perished, or was involved with 911.  But I guess we were ALL involved with 911, it not only affected those directly involved but it involved us as a nation.  It involved our trust issues and brought back prejudice on such a high scale that some of us aren’t even sure to this day if we should trust ANYONE from the Middle East.

My view is that you can go on trusting just do so with discretion.  And it’s too bad that it has to be like that.  My story is a little different.

I was in Iran on 9/11.  On 9/12 I was taken as a prisoner and held captive in a POW type camp in the hills of Iran.  As far as I can guess we were held as leverage in case the USA decided to retaliate against the Middle East.   People who knew or were related to Americans were put into these camp.  I was raped, beaten and tortured for six weeks.  When I arrived home in November 2001 I weighed 70 pounds, had traumatic brain injury and most of my teeth had been knocked out.

What I’m about to say is crazy, but I don’t hate Muslims or Middle Easterners.  God knows I’ve tried and people can’t understand why, I don’t understand why.  I guess there were a couple years in Iran when I first moved there that were GREAT YEARS.  Not with my Iranian husband but with girls that I taught English to.  They weren’t just students they were my friends too.  Aged 10-19, these girls trusted me, so they would ask me questions about the USA, boys and religion.  Each day after class we’d sit down and just talk and they knew what they told me or asked I wouldn’t tell their parents.  We became so close and they were the ones who helped get me through Iran while I was kept there since my husband wouldn’t give his written permission to let me leave the country.  So I really enjoyed these girls and respect what they have to endure on a daily basis.  So I guess in my mind how can I hate a country or faith that these girls and others like them are a part of.  There are FANATICS in all religions, and those are the ones we have to fear.  Layla one of my students was killed in her fathers swimming pool for not being a virgin on her wedding night. I quit teaching soon after that.

I only wish the best for the survivors of this tragedy, but in reality we are all survivors and we are here today due to our choices in life.

Thank you for listening.  God Bless all!